260. The Neurobiology of Dieting: Evidence for Improving Mental Health with a Self-Care Approach

FNCE Recorded Sessions from 2018

The biological reason that diets do not work lies in the brain's role in defending a weight range that is specific to each individual.

  • SKU FNCE18260
Member Price
$32.00
Nonmember Price
$37.00

This product is free for those who attended FNCE® 2018.

Most people attempt weight loss at some point, whether due to medical recommendations or efforts to fit into culturally accepted body norms. Yet scientific research and life experiences demonstrate that dieting does not result in lasting weight loss for the vast majority of people. These efforts are not harmless; weight loss interventions can cause collateral damage to mental health by fostering body image issues, depression, and eating disorders. The biological reason that diets do not work lies in the brain's role in defending a weight range that is specific to each individual. Fortunately, the brain also supports the learning of new habits that can contribute to better mind and body health, even without weight loss. By promoting a self-care approach for bodies of all sizes, dietitians are well positioned to improve mental health and wellbeing while reducing weight stigma. Scientific evidence to support such a paradigm shift and practical skills for dietitians will be shared.

CPEU: 1.5
CPE Level: 2
Learning Codes: 5200, 4040, 5370

Learning Objectives

  • Describe the impacts of energy and nutrient restriction on the brain and body's function.
  • Summarize research evidence that suggests poor long-term outcomes for weight loss pursuits, including physical and mental health.
  • List practical skills dietitians can use for promoting self-care and behavior changes in complex clients without energy restrictions.

Speaker

  • Rebecca Scritchfield, MA, RDN, EP-C
  • Sandra Aamodt, PhD

Moderator

  • Megan A. Kniskern, MS, RD, CEDRD-S, LD/N

Planned with the Behavioral Health Nutrition DPG

  • SKU FNCE18260