386. Fiber's Essentiality for the Microbiota and Health: Connecting the Dots

FNCE Recorded Sessions from 2017

This session will acquaint RDNs with new 2016 FDA regulations for DF and most importantly a review of the approximate 25 newly approved Added Fibers to foods.

  • SKU FNCE17386
Member Price
$32.00
Nonmember Price
$37.00

This product is free for those who attended FNCE® 2017.

The Food and Drug Administration definition of dietary fiber recently shifted from one based on methods of chemical analysis to one based on health benefits. This session will acquaint RDNs with new 2016 FDA regulations for DF and most importantly a review of the approximate 25 newly approved Added Fibers to foods. These AF are required to provide evidence of benefit from six of the most recognized beneficial effects for human health. The presentation will focus on studies evaluating these health benefits as well as the essentiality of fermentable DF for growth and function of intestinal microbiota, including a review of the impact of specific highly marketed prebiotics compared to all types of fermentable DF. This program will provide a basis for evaluating current and future scientific evidence about all types of DF by connecting the dots between new FDA regulations, DF definitions, gut MB, and human intestinal, immunologic, and metabolic health.

CPEU: 1.5
CPE Level: 3
Learning Codes: 2070, 4030, 4040

Learning Objectives

  • Describe the 2016 FDA changes to the Nutrition Facts Label in regards to regulations, definitions, and recommendations for dietary fibers.
  • Explain how DF is the major source of energy for gut microbiota, how fermentation by MB leads to products that are active locally in the gut or can exert a systemic influence on host metabolic or immune function, and how specific prebiotic fibers have been associated with selectively stimulating MB numbers, with shifts in abundance of dominant phyla, or with metabolic activity of MB that are asserted to improve host health.
  • Discuss reasons that current studies show inconsistent effects of specific DF on MB including the concepts that production of MB metabolites is more important than increased MB abundance or proportion; MB have functional redundancy, or produce similar metabolites, with many fiber substrates; and all types of fermentable DF are essential for MB function.

Speaker

  • Alexandra Kazaks, PhD, RDN, CDE
  • Dennis Gordon, PhD
  • SKU FNCE17386